Consultation Results

Submissions to Council’s Long-term Plan closed at 5pm Friday 20 April. Thank you to everyone who had their say. Below you will find the results of the online section for the six key proposals. Council will be considering submissions and adopting any changes in May and June.

Yes. We need a back-up option to our current water source

No. Happy with only one water source for the city

Alternative Water Supply

 
 In Invercargill we currently only have one source of drinking water. We get our water from the Oreti River at Branxholme. If, for any reason, this water supply is disrupted, the City would only have two and a half days’ supply of water. A disruption would lead to water restrictions that would affect businesses and industry, affect firefighting capability, the ability to flush away waste and threaten the availability of drinking water. Invercargill is one of very few communities of our size that rely on a single supply of water.
 
The Council has begun investigating what and where the alternative source may be, the second part of this project is to develop the source into a useable alternative. The source would need to have a different risk exposure to the current source and be developed to a sufficient capacity to protect the Community. The focus of the alternative supply would be providing for domestic and firefighting supplies, not necessarily business and industry. 

Although a major event that would make the Oreti supply unavailable is considered unlikely, the potential impact of such an event is huge. Events such as drought and contamination of the water supply could have a detrimental effect on the Community and health and safety would be compromised. 

The cost of developing the alternative water supply is budgeted at $10.7 million and will be loan funded. The work will be undertaken over the 2025/26 and 2026/27 financial years.

 

Option 1

Develop an alternative water supply. This will be funded by loans of $5.28m in 2025/26 & $5.42m in 2026/27 and will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as the Community is provided with an emergency water supply.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2025/26

$226,316

$8.46 / $0.16

2026/27

$715,152

$26.54 / $0.51

2027/28

$960,578

$35.38 / $0.68

Option 2

Retain the status quo.

Level of Service

No change.

Cost to Ratepayers

No additional cost to ratepayers.

Strengthen to 67% of earthquake standards with all floors available for use

Maintain outside only & abandon any internal use

Strengthen to 33% of earthquake standards with ground floor available for use only

Strengthen to 67% of earthquake standards with all floors available for use plus renovate the kitchen

Anderson House

Anderson House and Park were gifted to the Council in 1951. The Council became responsible for stewardship of the grounds, native bush areas and the buildings. The House is iconic, and has a deep history for Southland. Anderson House has been identified as having strength of less than 33% of the New Building Standards, and as such makes it an earthquake-prone building. We are not permitting long-term internal use of the building before it has been strengthened.

There is an expectation from some sectors of the Community that the House and Park will be managed and maintained for the use of future generations. We have begun investigating potential future uses of Anderson House as well as the options for strengthening the House

 

Our proposed option is to earthquake strengthen Anderson House to 67% of the New Building Standard. The necessary building consent will also trigger a responsibility for us to upgrade access in relation to means of escape, a lift to the first floor and toilet facilities.

The cost of strengthening and meeting the Building Act requirements at Anderson House is budgeted at $1,716,960 and will be undertaken in the 2019/20 financial year.

Option 1

Earthquake Strengthen Anderson House to 67% of the New Building Standard, triggering building consent and responsibilities for access in regard to means of escape, a lift to the first floor and toilet facilities. This will be funded by loans of $1.72m in 2019/20 and will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as the Community will once again be able to access Anderson House on both the ground and first levels.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2019/20

$67,947

$2.66 / $0.05

2020/21

$142,073

$5.51 / $0.11

2021/22

$142,047

$5.47 / $0.11

2022/23

$142,020

$5.43 / $0.10

2023/24

$147,521

$5.60 / $0.11

2024/25

$147,201

$5.54 / $0.11

2025/26

$147,303

$5.51 / $0.11

2026/27

$152,299

$5.65 / $0.11

2027/28

$152,382

$5.61 / $0.11

Option 2

Maintain external shell of building only and abandon use, making it as safe as possible without triggering Building Consent. This will be funded by loans of $0.19m in 2019/20 and will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

No change.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2019/20

$7,661

$0.30 / $0.01

2020/21

$16,019

$0.62 / $0.01

2021/22

$16,016

$0.62 / $0.01

2022/23

$16,013

$0.61 / $0.01

2023/24

$16,633

$0.63 / $0.01

2024/25

$16,597

$0.63 / $0.01

2025/26

$16,609

$0.62 / $0.01

2026/27

$17,172

$0.64 / $0.01

2027/28

$17,181

$0.63 / $0.01

Option 3

Earthquake Strengthen Anderson House to 33% of the New Building Standard, triggering building consent and responsibilities for access in regard to means of escape and toilet facilities – no use of upper story. This will be funded by loans of $0.95m in 2019/20 and will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as the Community will once again be able to access Anderson House but only on the ground level.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2019/20

$37,766

$1.48 / $0.03

2020/21

$78,965

$3.06 / $0.06

2021/22

$78,951

$3.04 / $0.06

2022/23

$78,936

$3.02 / $0.06

2023/24

$81,993

$3.11 / $0.06

2024/25

$81,816

$3.08 / $0.06

2025/26

$81,873

$3.06 / $0.06

2026/27

$84,469

$3.14 / $0.06

2027/28

$84,695

$3.12 / $0.06

Option 4

Earthquake strengthen Anderson House to 67% of the New Building Standard, triggering building consent and responsibilities for access in regard to means of escape, a lift to the first floor and toilet facilities, and renovate the kitchen area. This is similar to Option 1, but we have added in the kitchen renovation. This will be funded by loans of $1.92m in 2019/20 and will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as a safe facility is provided for public use. The building will have a number of functional uses.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2019/20

$75,838

$2.97 / $0. 06

2020/21

$158,574

$6.15 / $0.12

2021/22

$158,545

$6.11 / $0.12

2022/23

$158,514

$6.06 / $0.12

2023/24

$164,654

$6.25 / $0.12

2024/25

$164,297

$6.19 / $0.12

2025/26

$164,412

$6.15 / $0.12

2026/27

$169,988

$6.31 / $0.12

2027/28

$170,080

$6.26 / $0.12

Yes. We need an additional pool at Splash Palace

No. Happy with the current pool space at Splash Palace

Additional Pool at Splash Palace

 Swimming and water sports at Splash Palace are very popular activities for Invercargill’s community. There are over 400,000 admissions to Splash Palace every year and this number is increasing. Due to its popularity, Splash Palace is unable to provide adequate space for all users including general admissions, clubs and learn to swim.
 
To meet this ongoing demand, and to provide appropriate disabled access, we are proposing to build an additional pool adjacent to the existing complex. The pool is scheduled to be constructed in the 2020/21 year.
 
The pool would:
  • Be 25 x 25 x 2 metres.  
  • Have built in wheelchair access and stairs.
  • Meet FINA (International Swimming Federation) competition requirements.
  • Provide competition seating.
  • Be appropriately positioned to make use of the existing ancillary activities, for example the café and changing rooms, and will keep all staff in the same location.
 
The anticipated outcomes of constructing a new pool are:
  • Provision of more public space for lane swimming, aqua jogging and other uses.
  • Provision of a competition pool to allow for national waterpolo, swimming and canoe events.
  • A ‘redundancy’ should the main 50 metre pool need to be closed for any reason.
  • Provision of modern disabled accessibility options, for example, a permanent ramp and stairs.

We intend to fund the $6.3 million cost of constructing the second pool by loan and by asking other community funders for assistance through a grant. We have based our preferred option on obtaining external funding for the additional pool. We will apply for this funding only if we get community support for the project. There is still a level of uncertainty around whether we will obtain the funding when applied for. If we do not receive the funding, the project will not go ahead.

Option 1

Construct an additional pool adjacent to the existing Splash Palace facilities. This will be funded by external funders of $3.13m and loans of $3.13m in 2020/21 which will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as more space is made available for pool users.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2020/21

$129,018

$5.01 / $0.10

2021/22

$190,212

$7.33 / $0.14

2022/23

$194,587

$7.44 / $0.14

2023/24

$199,062

$7.55 / $0.15

2024/25

$203,840

$7.68 / $0.15

2025/26

$208,936

$7.81 / $0.15

2026/27

$214,368

$7.95 / $0.15

2027/28

$220,156

$8.11 / $0.16

Option 2

Retain the status quo.

Level of Service

Pool space remains inadequate for the current number of pool users.

Cost to Ratepayers

No additional cost to ratepayers.

No. Happy with current funding levels for the stadium

Yes. We need to increase funding by $300,000

Yes. We need to increase funding by $150,000

Increase grant funding to Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust

 
The Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust (the Trust) operates Stadium Southland. The Trust has approached the Council to increase its annual grant contribution from $400,000 to $700,000.
 
At present funding levels, the Trust has advised that it would only be able to continue to provide the current level of service at Stadium Southland for the next 12- 18 months.
 
Additional funding will enable the Stadium to continue to provide the current level of service to stadium users into the future along with meeting maintenance and capital renewal requirements.

On top of the current $400,000 grant, we presently rate for loan repayments on a $2 million grant supplied to the Trust in 2012/13. This loan has 15 years of repayments remaining. In 2018/19, loan servicing costs will amount to $132,140 bringing the total stadium related funding by the Council to $532,140. 

Our preferred option is to retain grant contributions at the current level of $400,000 and continue to meet loan servicing requirements ($132,140 in 2018/19).

 

Option 1

Continue to fund the Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust at current levels of funding ($400,000 grant & $132,140 loan servicing).

Total funding of $532,140 in 2018/19. 

 

Level of Service

No change to ratepayers. 

Stadium users may experience a lower level of service.

 

Cost to Ratepayers

No impact to ratepayers but there will be an impact to Stadium users in the future.

Option 1

Continue to fund the Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust at current levels of funding ($400,000 grant & $132,140 loan servicing).

Total funding of $532,140 in 2018/19. 

Level of Service

No change to ratepayers. 

Stadium users may experience a lower level of service.

Cost to Ratepayers

No impact to ratepayers but there will be an impact to Stadium users in the future.

Option 2

Increase funding to the Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust by $300,000 to $700,000 and continue to rate for loan repayments ($132,140 in 2018/19). 

Total funding of $832,140 in 2018/19.

Level of Service

No change to ratepayers or Stadium users. 

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2018/19

$300,000

$11.82/$0.23

2019/20

$300,000

$11.73/$0.23

2020/21

$300,000

$11.64/$0.22

2021/22

$300,000

$11.56/$0.22

2022/23

$300,000

$11.47/$0.22

2023/24

$300,000

$11.38/$0.22

2024/25

$300,000

$11.30/$0.22

2025/26

$300,000

$11.22/$0.22

2026/27

$300,000

$11.13/$0.21

2027/28

$300,000

$11.05/$0.21

Option 3

Increase funding to the Southland Indoor Leisure Centre Charitable Trust by $150,000 to $550,000 and continue to rate for loan repayments ($132,140 in 2018/19).

Total funding of $682,140 in 2018/19.

Level of Service

No change to ratepayers. 
Stadium users may experience a lower level of service.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2018/19

$150,000

$5.91/$0.11

2019/20

$150,000

$5.87/$0.11

2020/21

$150,000

$5.82/$0.11

2021/22

$150,000

$5.78/$0.11

2022/23

$150,000

$5.74/$0.11

2023/24

$150,000

$5.69/$0.11

2024/25

$150,000

$5.65/$0.11

2025/26

$150,000

$5.61/$0.11

2026/27

$150,000

$5.57/$0.11

2027/28

$150,000

$5.52/$0.11

Yes. Invercargill needs a new Art Centre in the heart of the city

No. Happy with the current art options in the city.

Arts and Creativity Invercargill

 
The Southland Regional Development Strategy has identified the need for an Art Centre in the heart of the City. We have undertaken consultation with our Community to determine whether there is demand for an Art Centre and what format it should take. This research has shown us that a traditional art gallery may not be well utilised, but an innovative art centre would deliver the rejuvenation that we are wanting.  
 
We are proposing to develop “Arts and Creativity Invercargill’ an Art Centre that is focused on people and will serve as a social hub. The Art Centre will have a social space, an activity space, service areas as well as the traditional presentation gallery space. The Art Centre will not only be a place for enjoying others artworks, but also for doing and creating your own.
 
The approach inverts the traditional idea of entering empty galleries by placing the busier, welcoming and more flexible spaces and activities up front and moving the quieter galleries deeper into the facility.
 
The design work will be undertaken from 2018/19 financial years with the facility opening to the public in 2022/23.

As a part of this proposal, we intend to undertake three separate projects over the next ten years. The first is the Art Centre, followed by a regional storage facility for our art and museum artefacts and finally the redevelopment of the Southland Museum and Art Gallery.

The recommended site for the Art Centre is at Wachner Place using Esk Street West. The total cost of developing the Art Centre is $16 million. Not all of this will be met by the Council and we anticipate receiving funding from Central Government and local Trusts to support the project. We are committing a $6.3 million contribution and we are seeking $5.3 million from the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, $3.2 million is expected to come from other Trust funds, which leaves a further $1.2 million to be fund raised. We have based our preferred option on obtaining external funding for the Art Centre project. We will apply for this funding only if we get community support for the project. There is still a level of uncertainty around whether we will receive the funding when applied for. If we do not receive the funding, the project will not go ahead.

We will also fund part of the operational costs of running the Art Centre which will be collected from rates.

Our preferred option is to develop the Art Centre on the Wachner Place site. 

 

Option 1

Develop and operate the Art Centre. This will be funded by external funders of $9.70m and loans totalling $16.00m by 2021/22 which will be repaid over a 20 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as a new attraction is available.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2018/19

$167,736

$6.61 / $0.13

2019/20

$267,324

$10.45 / $0.20

2020/21

$373,505

$14.50 / $0.28

2021/22

$721,650

$27.80 / $0.53

2022/23

$1,269,457

$48.54 / $0.93

2023/24

$1,307,606

$49.62 / $0.95

2024/25

$1,324,756

$49.90 / $0.96

2025/26

$1,344,759

$50.28 / $0.97

2026/27

$1,384,680

$51.38 / $0.99

2027/28

$1,407,281

$51.83 / $1.00

Option 2

Retain the status quo.

Level of Service

Remains at the current level.

Cost to Ratepayers

No additional cost to ratepayers but will impact the cost of the Museum redevelopment.

A detailed report on the Art Centre proposal can be accessed through Council’s website www.icc.govt.nz

Yes. Invercargill needs a Living Dinosaurs experience

No. Happy with the current set up at the museum.

Living Dinosaurs

 
We are proposing to build a high-quality tuatara and kakapo experience beside the Southland Museum and Art Gallery, enhancing and expanding the current tourism attraction. The Living Dinosaur Experience will celebrate two significant taonga species who call Murihiku their home. 
 
 The proposal is our response to a number of issues:
 
 1. Development of a new tourism attraction in Invercargill.
 
 2. The presence of tuatara is a risk to the environment of the museum collection and as such they require separation. The current tuatara facility requires significant renewals to improve appearance and address corrosion.
 
 3. The Department of Conservation is looking for a permanent home to hand rear kakapo chicks every 2-3 years as the current temporary location is not fit for purpose.
 
 4. The foyer at the Southland Museum and Art Gallery would require development to allow entry from the reception area to the Living Dinosaur experience.
 
 The Living Dinosaur Experience will provide a significant tourism asset and align with other anchor projects seeking to reinvigorate the City in accordance with the Southland Regional Development Strategy. It will also provide ongoing support to conservation programmes and protect an important part of Southland’s heritage.
 
 

The proposal is to build an indoor and outdoor facility which includes a Tuatara enclosure, a Kakapo hand rearing enclosure and Lab and a Living Dinosaur Experience Area. The total capital cost of the project is estimated at $5.07 million. We intend to seek a commercial partner to co-invest in the facility and there is an opportunity for the Department of Conservation to operate the Kakapo Lab and fund this work. We have based our preferred option on obtaining a commercial partner for the Living Dinosaurs Experience. We will complete our investigation into, and negotiations with, a commercial partner only if we get community support for the project. There is still a level of uncertainty around whether we will obtain a commercial partner. If we do not get a commercial partner, the project will not go ahead.

We will also fund part of the operational costs of running the Living Dinosaur Experience which will be collected from rates and entry fees.

It is our intention that Southlanders will have free entry to see tuatara behind glazing in an artificial environment, a similar tuatara experience as they have at present. Southlanders would then have the option to pay for the enhanced experience that would be available to all paying visitors. 

The facility will only cost ratepayers in its first year. Following this it is anticipated that it will be selffunding.

 

Option 1

Develop the Living Dinosaurs Experience. This will be funded by external funders of $2.54m and loans of $2.54m in 2019/20 which will be repaid over a 10 year period.

Level of Service

Will increase as a new attraction is available.

Cost to Ratepayers

Year

Total Rates

Year/week (average)

2019/20

$100,384

$3.93/ $0.08

Option 2

Retain the status quo.

Level of Service

. Remains at the current level, although renewal work will still be required for the current Tuatara facility

Cost to Ratepayers

No additional cost to ratepayers but will impact the cost of the Museum redevelopment.

A detailed report on the Living Dinosaur Experience can be accessed through Council’s website www.icc.govt.nz

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